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How healthy are eggs?

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Eggs are a very nutritious food and can be a healthy part of a well-balanced diet. They are a good source of protein, vitamins, and minerals and contain several important nutrients. One large egg contains about 6 grams of protein, along with small amounts of vitamins and minerals including vitamin A, vitamin B12, folate, and iron.

Eggs are also a good source of choline, which is a nutrient that is important for brain function and development. Choline plays a role in the production of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which is involved in learning and memory.

However, eggs also contain cholesterol, and it is important to consider this when deciding how many eggs to include in your diet. The American Heart Association recommends that adults consume no more than 300 milligrams of cholesterol per day, and one large egg contains about 186 milligrams of cholesterol.

Eggs can be part of a healthy diet for most people, but it is important to pay attention to your overall intake of cholesterol and to talk to a healthcare provider if you have any concerns about your cholesterol levels.

How many eggs are you allowed to eat per day?

There is no specific recommended daily intake of eggs, as they can be included in a healthy diet as part of a well-balanced meal plan. However, it is important to consider the nutrients that eggs provide and to consider the potential impact on your cholesterol levels when deciding how many eggs to include in your diet.

The American Heart Association recommends that adults consume no more than 300 milligrams of cholesterol per day. One large egg contains about 186 milligrams of cholesterol, so if you are trying to limit your cholesterol intake, you may want to consume fewer eggs or choose egg substitutes or egg whites, which are lower in cholesterol.

It is also important to pay attention to your overall diet and to include a variety of nutrient-rich foods in your meals and snacks. This can help ensure that you are getting all of the nutrients you need to support your health. If you have any concerns about your egg intake or your cholesterol levels, it is a good idea to talk to a healthcare provider for personalized guidance.

Myths about eating eggs

There are several myths about eating eggs that have been debunked by scientific research. Here are a few common myths about eggs:

Myth: Eating eggs increases your risk of heart disease. Fact: Some studies have suggested that high intake of cholesterol from foods like eggs may increase the risk of heart disease, but more recent research has found that the relationship between dietary cholesterol and blood cholesterol is not as clear as previously thought. In fact, some studies have found that moderate egg consumption may not have a significant impact on cholesterol levels or heart disease risk.

Myth: Egg yolks are unhealthy. Fact: Egg yolks are a nutritious part of the egg and contain many important nutrients, including protein, vitamins, and minerals. While egg yolks do contain cholesterol, they are also a good source of choline, which is important for brain function and development.

Myth: It's best to only eat the egg whites. Fact: While egg whites are a good source of protein and are lower in calories and cholesterol than the yolks, they do not contain all of the nutrients found in whole eggs. Egg yolks are a good source of nutrients like vitamin A, vitamin D, and choline, and it is generally recommended to include both the whites and yolks in your diet.

Myth: It's unhealthy to eat eggs every day. Fact: There is no specific recommended daily intake of eggs, and they can be included in a healthy diet as part of a well-balanced meal plan. However, it is important to pay attention to your overall nutrient intake and to include a variety of nutrient-rich foods in your diet. If you have any concerns about your egg intake or your cholesterol levels, it is a good idea to talk to a healthcare provider for personalized guidance.

Can eating eggs make you sick?

Eggs are generally safe to eat when they are cooked properly. However, if eggs are not stored or handled properly, they can become contaminated with bacteria, such as Salmonella, which can cause food poisoning.

To reduce the risk of food poisoning from eggs:

  • Store eggs in the refrigerator at a temperature of 40°F (4°C) or below.
  • Wash your hands, utensils, and cooking surfaces with hot, soapy water before and after handling eggs.
  • Cook eggs until the yolks and whites are firm. Scrambled eggs should be cooked until they are no longer runny, and fried eggs should be cooked until the yolks and whites are fully set.
  • Avoid consuming raw or undercooked eggs. This includes dishes like raw cookie dough or homemade mayonnaise, which may contain raw eggs.

If you are concerned about the risk of food poisoning from eggs, you may want to choose pasteurized eggs, which have been treated to kill bacteria that may be present. Pasteurized eggs can be used in any recipe that calls for raw eggs, including recipes for mayonnaise, ice cream, and hollandaise sauce.

If you experience symptoms such as diarrhea, vomiting, or fever after consuming eggs, it is important to see a healthcare provider for proper treatment.