Unsupported Browser

Your web browser appears to be outdated. Our website may not look quite right in it.

Please consider updating your browser to enjoy an optimal experience.

Dismiss this message

Blog Image

Everything you need to know about all-purpose flour

20

Many or all of the products featured here can be from partners who compensate us. This may influence which products we write about and where and how the product appears on a page. However, this does not influencer our evaluations. Our opinions are our own.


All-purpose flour is a type of flour that is made from a blend of hard and soft wheat flours. It is a versatile flour that can be used for a wide range of baking applications, including bread, cakes, cookies, pastries, and more.

One of the main characteristics of all-purpose flour is its protein content, which typically falls in the range of 10-12%. This protein content gives the flour its structure and helps it to rise when combined with a leavening agent such as yeast or baking powder.

All-purpose flour is available in both bleached and unbleached varieties. Bleached flour has been treated with chemicals to whiten the flour and improve its texture, while unbleached flour has not been treated and has a slightly off-white color. Both types of all-purpose flour can be used interchangeably in recipes, although some bakers may prefer the taste and texture of unbleached flour.

All-purpose flour is also available in enriched and whole grain varieties. Enriched flour has had some of the nutrients that are lost during the milling process added back in, while whole grain flour is made from the whole grain, including the bran and germ. Whole grain flour has a higher fiber and nutrient content than enriched flour, but it may result in a denser final product due to the presence of the bran and germ.

Overall, all-purpose flour is a widely available, affordable, and versatile ingredient that can be used in a variety of baking applications.

Which dishes can I prepare with all-purpose flour?

All-purpose flour can be used in a wide range of dishes, including:

  • Bread: All-purpose flour can be used to make a variety of breads, including sandwich bread, rolls, and more.

  • Cakes: All-purpose flour is a common ingredient in cakes, providing structure and helping the cake to rise.

  • Cookies: All-purpose flour is often used in cookies, providing structure and helping the cookies to hold their shape.

  • Pastries: All-purpose flour is often used in pastries such as pie crusts, tarts, and more.

  • Pancakes and waffles: All-purpose flour can be used to make pancakes and waffles, providing structure and helping them to rise.

  • Biscuits: All-purpose flour is often used in biscuit recipes, providing structure and helping the biscuits to hold their shape.

  • Pizza dough: All-purpose flour can be used to make pizza dough, providing structure and helping the dough to rise.

In addition to these dishes, all-purpose flour can also be used as a thickening agent in sauces, soups, and other dishes. It can also be used to coat foods before frying or baking to create a crispy exterior. Overall, all-purpose flour is a versatile ingredient that can be used in many different dishes.

What nutrients does all-purpose flour contain?

All-purpose flour is a good source of carbohydrates and protein. One cup (120 grams) of all-purpose flour contains approximately:

  • 438 calories
  • 96 grams of carbohydrates
  • 12 grams of protein
  • 1 gram of fat

All-purpose flour also contains small amounts of other nutrients, including:

  • B vitamins: All-purpose flour is a good source of several B vitamins, including thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, and folate. These vitamins are important for energy metabolism, brain function, and the production of red blood cells.

  • Iron: All-purpose flour is a good source of iron, which is an essential mineral that is necessary for the production of red blood cells and the transportation of oxygen throughout the body.

  • Selenium: All-purpose flour is also a good source of selenium, a trace mineral that is important for immune function and thyroid health.

It's important to note that the nutrient content of all-purpose flour can vary depending on the type of flour and how it is processed. Enriched flour, for example, has had some of the nutrients that are lost during the milling process added back in, while whole grain flour has a higher fiber and nutrient content due to the presence of the bran and germ.